Safer roads thanks to signals and control system from Kummler+Matter

Intelligent control systems and networked traffic signals in sensitive areas are crucial in order to ensure that traffic runs smoothly on frequently travelled Swiss roadways. Kummler+Matter has implemented two exciting transport technology projects in Ascona and Basel, which have contributed to making the roads safer.

The employees at Kummler+Matter are experienced transport specialists. They plan and install a wide variety of traffic control systems and signals, such as in the bypass tunnel in Ascona or on the eastern bypass around Basel.

 

New traffic control system for Ascona tunnel

The one-kilometre-long bypass tunnel in Ascona is part of the A13 motorway which travels from Bellinzona through Locarno to Brissago. The canton of Ticino contracted Kummler+Matter to thoroughly modernise the entire traffic control system in the tunnel and on the portions of open motorway at either side of the tunnel.

The task involved replacing the switching signals, which were up to 20 years old, as well as replacing 28 light signals at various locations. The dynamic entry signal system was also completely replaced, along with the control cables, supply cables and fibre-optic cables. All of the work had to be planned so that it could be carried out at night to ensure that through traffic would not be impeded.

 

Safer roads on the eastern bypass in Basel

The high-capacity road network in and around Basel is primarily made up of the A2/A3 motorway. In the east of the city, it forms the “eastern bypass”, which travels from the border in Weil am Rhein across the Rhine river to the Hagnau junction. As part of a larger modernisation project, Kummler+Matter received the contract to work together with two partner companies to replace the signals on the eastern bypass. The entire system had to be updated due to its age, as well as in order to increase road safety and improve the flow of traffic.

Coordinating the project so that it could be completed within a very tight schedule posed a particular challenge. In addition, the dimensions of the signals themselves placed special demands on the installation teams: the signals are up to 6.5 metres wide and 4.5 metres high. The project began in October 2014 and is scheduled to be completed in September 2015.